Have you ever seen a trillion dollars?

first_imgThe full post is much better, it shows you what all different amounts of money looks like from $10,000 to $100 million. Also, if you look closely at the picture you will notice a little red dot at the bottom left corner, it’s not a dot though, it’s a human being and each square is a full pallet of $100 bills.You can join the discussion on reddit here and here is the source of this post. With all these “bailouts” and such, you hear the words bailout, billions, and trillions, and people act like it’s no big deal. Have you ever seen a trillion dollars? Well, it IS a big deal…last_img read more

BKM for optimising SMS Addon operations – how would you like 100% success rates?

first_imgFor those of you out there that are  using the SMS Addon the following might be of interest, if seeing close to 100% success rates is your thing…If you’ve been using the SMS Addon together with Microsoft SMS as your vPro enabled management console of choice then you might have experienced less than 100% success rates when you’re trying to perform AMT operations on collections of machines. The following details I will be providing have been devised specifically in the context of using the AMT wake-up feature for a Power Management Use Case, however you can extrapolate the essence and apply elsewhere if you’re using some of the other features in the SMS Addon…Ok enough of an introduction.If you’re implementing the power management use case, then before you’ll be using the AMT wake-up feature, you’ll be putting machines to sleep according to a certain policy you’ve put together (user initiated, SMS job executed shutdown.exe or some other shutdown scripts). However, you want to be sure that the machines you have put to sleep can be woken up on demand – mandatory advertisement triggered wake-up, scheduled wake-up or console initiated wake-up. Finding out you can’t wake some machines up that you’ve put to sleep is far from being ideal – effectively you’re reducing the success rate of your use case and you’re putting machines in a state where you’re benefiting from power savings, but you’ve compromised on your ability to get access to that machine from remote.What might interest you then is a deterministic way to ensure that every machine you put to sleep as part of your power management use case, you can wake up. Well… we’ve done just that.Here is the trick – you create your SMS collection for machines that you want to put to sleep and then wake-up, with a simple SQL statement of:’ Select * where iAMTStatus = 1′  – the key here is this field iAMTStatus = 1 which is a return value that confirms the SMS Addon can communicate successfully with the vPro machine. Therefore you now have a deterministic way of knowing that a machine that you’ve put to sleep can be woken up using SMS Addon and the AMT wake-up feature. An improvement on that is to run an AMT discovery daily (or some other frequency) to dynamically update the collection based on the ability of the SMS Addon to get to machines successfully. This will cater for if there are any changes in your environment, which there might or might not be. Currently the only way to run an AMT Discovery repeatedly on machines that have already been discovered in the past is to manually right click on a collection in the SMS Console and select AMT Discovery. We might have a more automated way of doing this soon… so watch this space.Hopefully you find this useful.- a caveat/disclaimer I should perhaps mention is that his method does not mean you will have 100% success rate for ALL your machines. Undoubtedly you will have some machines that do not have iAMTStatus = 1. Effectively what you’re doing here is defining the scope.last_img read more

Cut the Clutter: Working Wire-Free with Intel® Technology

first_imgIf you’re reading this at your desk in a typical office, chances are good that you have a ton of cables connecting your monitor and other peripherals to your computer. The more you look at them, the more unsightly you realize they are. In fact, they’re actually taking up quite a bit of room on your desk when you think about it. So much clutter.The cables aren’t just cluttering your desk — they’re everywhere. Get up right now and walk into a conference room. More than likely, you have a large-screen TV or a projector used for sharing your screen. Now quick, off the top of your head, do you know which adapter to use for which screen? Didn’t think so.Let’s say you did know. You bring your laptop into the room and plug in the cord and adapter to the right port on your computer. You fire up the projector and … nothing. Is the cord broken? Is it a bad adapter? Is the port on your laptop dead? With so many cords, ports, and adapters it’s hard to pinpoint exactly where the problem is.Cables can be a joke — ditch unsure technologies and work reliably cord-free.Introducing Intel Pro Wireless Display TechnologyThankfully, we’re entering a world where we won’t need to worry about these things much longer. New Intel Pro Wireless Display Technology (WiDi) is the solution to your cord-clutter-wrong-adapter woes. Intel Pro WiDi allows you to wirelessly connect your devices to screens and projectors for easy collaboration.Soon, display cords and adapters will be a thing of the past. You’ll be able to free up the part of your brain that used to think about HDMI or VGA adapters and put that time you used to spend fumbling and groaning over cords and adapters toward product launch strategy and growing your small business — you know, the stuff meetings are supposed to be about.There is A Better Way to Work. Click here to learn how your business can go cord-free today.last_img read more

Blockchain – Should We Take Notice?

first_imgWhen I was a child there was this terrific program on the TV called Tomorrow’s World. Its concept was simple, a posh chap called Raymond would show us often ludicrous inventions and explain how they were about to be part of our everyday lives. He would demonstrate these contraptions generally overlooking the real world limitations of money and various accepted laws of physics. As a small boy I was captivated by the idea of shortly being able to travel by jetpack and Mars becoming an alternative destination to the seaside for our family summer holiday.For the last six months or so, I have been consuming my idle cycles at work looking at Blockchain. I must say, it does reminds me a lot of those Thursday evenings in front of the TV in the 1970s. Everyone talks about this technology as if it is mature, has been around forever and will shortly be behind everything we do. Perhaps it will be, but like jetpacks, we’re being asked to take a leap of faith that its use limitation will be overcome. Blockchain has limitations. It is painfully slow—approximately 5 transactions per second—there are no rules how it can and cannot be used, and it has no common language for users to communicate. Like the early days of the Internet, no one has any real idea how to commercialize it either. In reality, it’s not new. We’ve had ledgers since the Romans and networks for nearly as long. So, is the technology a dud? Ehhh. No!I have no idea if what we are seeing is akin to the first TV broadcast or perhaps TV in colour. Is it the Internet or just cloud computing? Only time will tell if this is the evolution and culmination of a set of ideas, or a real revolutionary change. What I do know is that it has the possibility of being able to provide an almost uncorruptible record of everything we do, keep, or move. That is a seductive promise.  Sure there are likely to be a number of false starts and we will have a lot of Never_To_Be_Heard_Of_Again.com before we find Google. It wouldn’t surprise me if, when it does become mainstream, Blockchain looks nothing like it does today. What I do know is there are a lot of people brighter than me consuming their primary thought cycles to look at this. Some of whom work for some big name companies. So I for one will continue to look at it even if I am not sure why. What about you?last_img read more

Indian Scientists Blast Proposal to Improve Animal Welfare

first_img Indian scientists are calling for a major rewrite of a proposed animal welfare law that they say could undermine research involving animals. A government draft of the legislation is too vague and carries unreasonably harsh penalties, argued scientists attending a 15 September meeting about the plan at the Indian National Science Academy (INSA) in New Delhi. The proposed Animal Welfare Act of 2011 aims to strengthen India’s overall efforts to prevent animal cruelty and includes provisions covering research. The nation has about 5000 research institutions that carry out animal experiments, according to the Animal Welfare Board of India, a government agency that enforces animal treatment rules. It estimates that just 1700 are properly registered with the government, however, and that just 200 have “adequate” facilities for housing and caring for research animals. “Unregulated experimentation is rampant,” says S. Chinny Krishna, a chemical engineer and vice chair of the board. “Animals are misused in India, even though many are revered as Gods.” Many researchers, however, say the draft proposal, which the government could send to Parliament later this year, goes too far. For example, its definition of an “animal” as “any living creature other than human being,” is too vague, says INSA President Krishan Lal, a physicist. The definition does not make it clear, for example, whether it applies to microbes or animals not known to feel pain. Another provision says researchers should avoid experiments “on larger animals … when it is possible to achieve the same results by experiments upon smaller animals,” without defining what constitutes large or small. The draft also appears to empower regulators to ban “experiments and dissections” designed to teach students at “undergraduate medical colleges, pharmacy colleges, zoology or other degree and diploma colleges and universities,” or train technicians learning “manual skills,” INSA notes. And violators could face stiff punishments, including imprisonment of up to 3 years and fines of about $1000. Those penalties are “draconian and unjustified,” says cardiologist K. K. Talwar, president of India’s National Academy of Medical Sciences and chair of the Medical Council of India in New Delhi. The proposal “has a clear and implicit agenda of preventing any usage, even legitimate usage of experimental animals,” he says. The government is promising to incorporate some of the scientist’s suggestions into a new draft. But Anjani Kumar, an official involved in that process, warned of other potential changes that could raise new objections — such as increasing penalties to up to 5 years and $250,000 per violation. That would be an “absurdity,” says INSA’s Lal. Most Indian scientists do not earn $250,000 over their entire careers, he notes. His group is planning to write to every Member of Parliament to express concern and recommend changes. “Science and animal welfare can coexist,” he says. “The government should not put roadblocks on life science research.” Regulators could ban experiments involving animals, like this white rat, at Indian universities, under a proposed animal welfare law. Pallava Bagla last_img read more

Watch this tiny robot do a backflip

first_imgRobots can go to Mars, but don’t ask them to jump. Our metal companions are clumsy and stiff. (Just watch them fall.) In a new study, scientists rectified this handicap by drawing inspiration from more than 20 animals, including fleas, mountain goats, and even humans, specifically parkour artists who basically perform improvised outdoor gymnastics. They drew most of their inspiration from a small nocturnal primate called a galago, or, more commonly, a bush baby. Bush babies have a unique adaptation called power modulation that allows them to quickly build up and store energy in their tendons then release it rapidly to launch off the ground in a leap 15 times more powerful than what their muscles could do alone. The robot the team designed is named Salto—a play on saltatorial locomotion, a fancy name for two-legged jumping movement, and the famous sled dog Balto, because the researchers hope agile bots like this can assist in search-and-rescue missions someday. Unlike the bush baby, the bot has a spring instead of tendons. It also has a tail that can move up and down to adjust its body midair, a trick borrowing from the leaping agama lizard. At 100 grams, Salto weighs as much as a regular-size Snickers bar, but it has a fully extended height of 26 centimeters. All the robot’s traits culminate in its signature trick: the wall jump. Just like a parkour artist, Salto leaps at a wall, reorients in midair, propels off the wall, and, finally, soars to new heights—sometimes ending in a backflip for added flair, the team reports today in Science Robotics. As cool as the wall jump is, though, the bot can’t quite best the jumping ability of the bush baby. Salto’s jumps are 22% less powerful than the cuddly creature’s. Even still, this is, quite literally, a giant leap for robot-kind.last_img read more

Who’s the toughest bird? Continentwide ranking reveals a surprise

first_img If lions are king of the savanna, woodpeckers are probably king of your backyard. Or as researchers write this week on bioRxiv, when a fight for food breaks out, “bigger is better, but woodpeckers are best.” Seeking to create a continentwide pecking order of birds in the United States and Canada, the team turned to citizen science. Project FeederWatch, associated with Cornell University’s ornithology lab, is an online database with more than 20,000 users documenting feeder bird behavior right in their backyards. Just as the team expected, birds fall into a ranking system based on body size. (In a fair matchup, two starlings duke it out in image above.) There are a few nuances, however. The researchers confirmed a previously studied “rock-paper-scissor” conflict in some cases when birds are similar in size. For example, when all three species are in the same place, the house finch dominates the purple finch, the purple finch dominates the dark-eyed junco, and the dark-eyed junco dominates the house finch. To their surprise, however, woodpeckers were more dominant than expected given their size, which varies among woodpecker species. So basically if woodpeckers were boxers they’d always dominate their given weight class. (This is probably because—unlike boxers—they can take hard hits to the head without sustaining brain injury.) And although the paper has generated some interesting fantasies about unlikely bird battles on Twitter, the researchers question how biologically meaningful a continentwide hierarchy really is when some birds will never really throw down in nature—for now. Perhaps, the team puts forth, the list will become a handy reference as different species’ ranges shift and encroach on others as the climate changes.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Who’s the toughest bird? Continentwide ranking reveals a surprise By Rachael LallensackFeb. 3, 2017 , 2:15 PMlast_img read more

Glass shield may protect water bears from dehydration

first_img By Mitch LeslieMar. 16, 2017 , 12:00 PM Unfazed by extreme heat, radiation, and being blasted into space, the pudgy microscopic predators known as tardigrades (pictured) are champion survivors. Now, researchers may have uncovered the trick behind one of their most impressive feats: their ability to survive droughts by drying up and then rehydrating years or maybe even decades later. Also known as water bears and moss piglets, tardigrades live in aquatic habitats all over the world, so this ability comes in handy when their liquid home evaporates. During the process, they essentially lose all the water in their body and cells. The creatures also start pumping out unique, amorphous proteins that form a glasslike material inside of their cells, researchers report today in Molecular Cell. The material may encase and shelter vital molecules, such as other proteins, until the dry spell is over. The scientists say we might be able to borrow the protective proteins to improve the drought tolerance of crops and to preserve vaccines so that they don’t need to remain frozen or refrigerated.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Glass shield may protect water bears from dehydrationlast_img read more

Senate budgetmakers move to keep ARPA-E, bump up DOE science spending

first_img In another provision, Senate appropriators once again have moved to zero out funding for the U.S. contribution to ITER, the gigantic fusion experiment under construction near Cadarache in France. The House has voted to pony up $63 million for ITER next year, the amount requested by the White House.The subcommittee did not provide full details of the bill, which is scheduled to go to the full Senate appropriations committee on Thursday. U.S. Senate budgetmakers are headed to a showdown with their counterparts in the House of Representatives over the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). A Senate appropriations subcommittee voted today to give ARPA-E, which aims to quickly incubate the best ideas from basic research and turn them into fledging energy technologies, an 8% increase, to $330 million, in the 2018 fiscal year that begins 1 October. In contrast, a House spending panel voted last week to eliminate the young agency, which got its start in 2009.In addition, the Senate subcommittee would bump up the budget of DOE’s basic research wing, the Office of Science, by $158 million, or 3%, to $5.55 billion. In contrast, the House bill would keep the budget of the Office of Science flat at $5.39 billion. (In its budget proposal, the Trump administration called for cutting the office’s budget by 17%, to $4.47 billion, and eliminating ARPA-E.)Both the ARPA-E and Office of Science numbers are part of a $38.4 billion bill that sets funding levels for DOE, the Army Corps of Engineers, and other agencies. Its language boosting DOE’s science spending and protecting ARPA-E is not a surprise: Senators signaled last month that they weren’t keen on the White House’s deep proposed cuts. On the idea of eliminating ARPA-E, for example, Senator Lamar Alexander (R–TN), chair of the Senate appropriations subcommittee that oversees DOE, said: “That is not what we are going to do.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Senate budgetmakers move to keep ARPA-E, bump up DOE science spending OGphoto/iStockphoto By Adrian ChoJul. 18, 2017 , 4:30 PMlast_img read more

Fetal tissue is ‘gold standard’ for key studies, NIH workshop concludes

first_imgThe following is a summary of the workshop, Recent Advances and Opportunities in the Development and Use of Humanized Immune System Mouse Models. This summary reflects the opinions of the meeting participants. It does not represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services nor the National Institutes of Health. On December 18, 2018, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), in coordination with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of the Director and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), conducted a workshop to assess recent advances and opportunities in the development and use of humanized immune system (HIS) mouse models, in which the immune system of the mouse is partially replaced with human immune cells and tissues. Participants included leading scientists in the fields of immune system development and function, transplant immunology, autoimmunity, and infectious disease research. Adm. Brett Giroir, Assistant Secretary of Health at HHS, welcomed the participants and described HHS interest in this area, including a clearer understanding of the limitations and adequacy of existing HIS models, and the possibility of developing scientifically validated alternatives to the use of human fetal tissue. Dr. Daniel Rotrosen, Director of NIAID’s Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation, provided an overview of the workshop goals and expected topics of discussion, including: evaluation of the features, strengths and limitations of current HIS mouse models; procedures to compare HIS models made from fetal and non-fetal tissue sources; and studies that would be required to fully characterize and standardize these models.  Dr. Lawrence Tabak, NIH Principal Deputy Director, provided brief introductory comments on behalf of NIH.Dr. Leonard Shultz of the Jackson Laboratory provided a comprehensive summary of HIS mouse model development and usage from 1988 to the present. In the breakout sessions that followed, participants discussed the strengths and limitations of various HIS mouse models and provided opinions on ways to optimize HIS models for the development of vaccines and therapeutics for infectious and immune-mediated diseases and cancer. The meeting participants reconvened for reports from the two breakout groups and a final discussion that resulted in the following summary points: This summary is not intended to prejudge the outcome of the HHS audit. By Meredith WadmanDec. 19, 2018 , 7:30 PM Biological scientists currently have no better alternatives to using fetal tissue to give mice humanlike immune systems, concluded scientists who convened yesterday at a National Institutes of Health (NIH) workshop to discuss the issue. Such humanized mice “remain the ‘gold standard’” for many kinds of studies, the scientists said, and any alternative animal model should be tested against such mice before being widely adopted, according to a report on the closed-door workshop issued tonight by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), NIH’s parent department.The workshop came amidst a growing storm surrounding humanized mice, which are often created using human fetal tissue from elective abortions that would otherwise be discarded. Antiabortion groups are pushing President Donald Trump’s administration to stop funding research involving human fetal tissue. And they are calling on Trump to fire NIH Director Francis Collins, who last week spoke out on the need for such research.In response to pressure from abortion opponents, in September, HHS announced it was launching a review of federally funded fetal tissue research. It canceled one contract that the Food and Drug Administration relied on to generate humanized mice for drug testing. It has also taken steps to stop some NIH laboratories from acquiring new fetal tissue. And earlier this month, NIH announced it would be spending $20 million over the next 2 years to study alternatives to humanized mice and other uses of fetal tissue in research.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Major scientific advances have been made in understanding infectious disease pathogenesis and development of therapeutics using HIS mouse models made with human fetal tissue. No single humanized immune system model is universally appropriate or optimal for all applications. Various models can recapitulate key aspects of human T cell immunity; existing models are less able to recapitulate human innate immunity and antibody responses regardless of tissue source. Improvements in modeling antibody responses should be a focus of future work and may be particularly important for advances in vaccinology and in modeling infectious, autoimmune, and allergic diseases. Few direct comparisons have been conducted of HIS mice derived using fetal vs. non-fetal human tissue sources. Meeting participants included investigators working on fetal tissue-derived and non-fetal tissue-derived HIS models. Considering published data and other information shared at this meeting, participants expressed the opinion that fetal tissue-derived HIS models remain the “gold standard” to which other model systems should be compared. This preference is based on the preponderance of data indicating superior engraftment, differentiation, survival and function of the adaptive immune cells (particularly T cells) in fetal tissue-derived models. Following the breakout sessions, there was strong opinion that work should proceed on a variety of models derived with fetal tissues or from alternative sources. Correction, 20 December 2018, 1:17 p.m.: Our original story misattributed the quote beginning “NIAID will not pause or ban funding of fetal tissue research..” It was said by HHS’s Brett Giroir, not NIAID’s Daniel Rotrosen. Those potential mouse alternatives were the subject of yesterday’s workshop in Rockville, Maryland, which was sponsored by NIH’s National Institute on Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and attended by several dozen scientists. According to HHS’s workshop report (see below), the researchers said a “preponderance of data” supports a preference for using humanized mice to test certain kinds of drugs and explore diseases including HIV/AIDS. Those data, it states, indicate the mice are superior to other mice that don’t rely on engrafted fetal tissue, because the transplanted tissue takes root better, differentiates better, and survives and functions better.But this conclusion, HHS emphasized in its statement, “is not intended to pre-judge the outcome” of the department’s ongoing review of fetal tissue research.In an additional statement tonight to ScienceInsider, an HHS spokesperson also contradicted a report published yesterday by The Washington Post that the department has reversed a decision to limit one relevant federal contract. Earlier this month, HHS told researchers who execute a key NIH contract to develop humanized mice at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), that their funding would be renewed for just 90 days, not the usual 1 year. The Post reported that restriction was being lifted. But HHS said today that the UCSF “contract remains on the 90-day extension to ensure continuity of service until the audit is completed and a final decision can be made about the contract.”In response to a question from ScienceInsider, an HHS spokesperson again declined to address whether the HHS review, being led by Assistant Secretary for Health Brett Giroir, will next examine the scores of NIH grants to university researchers that involve fetal tissue. These extramural grants represent about $80 million of the roughly $100 million that NIH estimates it spends on research projects that use fetal tissue.The HHS spokesperson confirmed that Giroir, in addressing the scientists at yesterday’s workshop, told them the administration had not decided to halt any NIH funding. Rather, he said, the question is under review.But according to one workshop participant, immunologist Irving Weissman of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who joined the meeting by phone, Giroir assured the scientists at the meeting that their research is not in danger. In an email, Weissman said he told participants that “NIAID will not pause or ban funding of fetal tissue research so long as there is no profit motive, so long as there is proper informed consent for the disposition of the fetal remains for research, and so long as the consent laws are consistent within each individual state’s laws on the issue.” (The NIAID funds many, but not nearly all, of the scores of NIH research projects that rely in some measure on fetal tissue.)Those statements, first reported by the Post, provoked outrage today among abortion opponents. They said it was the second time senior federal officials “have jumped ahead of the Administration’s ongoing audit process—both times reaching conclusions that are out of step with the President’s pro-life agenda,” said Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List in Washington, D.C., in a statement. “If these statements are allowed to stand, and policy continues unchanged, it would be the first time the Trump Administration has broken with the pro-life movement. Pro-life voters do not want to foot the bill for any research that involves harvesting the body parts of unborn children from induced abortion.”Yesterday, other antiabortion groups also called for the ouster of Collins, who last week made comments defending fetal tissue research. “Director Collins must be replaced with someone who recognizes that children who are killed by abortion should be mourned, not experimented on,” Lila Rose, the director of the abortion-opposing group Live Action said in a statement yesterday. “Collins’ actions are inconsistent with the pro-life policies of this administration and with the consensus of Americans who oppose entangling taxpayer dollars with abortion. It is time for his departure,” said Jeanne Mancini, president of March for Life in Washington, D.C., in a statement.So far, those calls have not elicited any public response from HHS or the White House. Here is the HHS summary of the workshop: Fetal tissue is ‘gold standard’ for key studies, NIH workshop concludeslast_img read more

Airborne microplastics found atop France’s remote Pyrenees mountains

first_img By Alex FoxApr. 15, 2019 , 11:00 AM spiderstock/istockphoto Microscopic fragments of plastic have invaded the farthest reaches of the sea, from the depths of the Mariana Trench to the freezing waters off Antarctica. Now, researchers have found that such microplastics have polluted the Pyrenees mountains, expanding plastic’s dominion to previously unknown heights.Prior studies have shown that microplastics, which can be ingested and inhaled by humans—and which may lead to reproductive issues in some marine mollusks—can rise up into the atmosphere and drop back to solid ground in the cities they come from. But scientists thought these plastics couldn’t travel very far from their urban sources.To find out just how far they can go, the researchers collected particles falling from the sky in dust, rain, and snow for 5 months at the Bernadouze meteorological station in the Pyrenees mountains in southwestern France—100 kilometers from the nearest city.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To their horror, the authors found plastics, predominantly the kind from the single-use packaging used in shipping. From their sample, they determined that each day, an average of 365 plastic particles sifted down from above into the square meter surface of the collection device. If comparable quantities of airborne microplastic fall across the rest of the country, the researchers estimate roughly 2000 tons of plastic blanket France each year, they report today in Nature Geoscience.Computer simulations corroborated the notion that the plastic fragments, films, and fibers collected could have originated in cities, suggesting the microplastics floated at least 100 kilometers before falling back to Earth. But researchers say these tiny particles may travel much farther. Dust particles from the Sahara Desert, for example, have been found in the Pyrenees, even though they are twice as large and twice as heavy as the microplastics found in the study.Pieces of plastic small enough to sail into the atmosphere are virtually impossible to clean up, say the researchers, suggesting the only viable solution is to produce less in the first place. Until then, the researchers plan to keep up their detective work—tracking the airborne microplastics all the way back to their source.center_img Airborne microplastics found atop France’s remote Pyrenees mountainslast_img read more

Some of NIH’s chimpanzees will not retire to a sanctuary as planned

first_img By David GrimmOct. 24, 2019 , 5:55 PM Biomedical research on chimpanzees effectively ended in 2015, when NIH announced it would no longer fund such studies. The agency also pledged to retire all of the approximately 300 chimps it owned or supported to Chimp Haven. Experts expected that the 340 or so other chimpanzees privately owned for research would follow suit. But retirement proceeded slowly. In the 2 years after NIH’s decision, only 51 government-owned or -supported chimps and 22 privately owned chimps had entered sanctuaries.In 2017, NIH announced a formal retirement plan, with Anderson predicting most of its animals would enter a sanctuary within 10 years. And by the following year, retirement had picked up, with more chimps in sanctuaries than in biomedical facilities for the first time. Today, only 178 government-owned or -supported chimpanzees live in biomedical primate facilities: the Alamogordo Primate Facility in New Mexico; the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Bastrop, Texas; and the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio. About 190 chimpanzees remain at two private facilities: the New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, and Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta.Many of these remaining chimps have lived at their facilities for decades, which means they’re nearing the end of their lives, and have diabetes, heart conditions, and other infirmities. Some in the biomedical community have argued that these animals are too sick and frail to survive the stresses of a long trip and a new living facility, with new humans and chimps to get used to. They point to nine older chimps that died within 2 years of being transferred from the MD Anderson Cancer Center to Chimp Haven about 5 years ago.In 2018, NIH created a working group to help the agency figure out which chimpanzees were fit to move to a sanctuary. A panel of NIH veterinarians not involved with the agency’s Chimpanzee Management Program reviewed the health records of chimps at the Alamogordo facility and consulted the vets there. In a report completed in September, the vets recommended that all 44 remaining chimpanzees at Alamogordo remain there for the rest of their lives. “Many of the animals had varying degrees of cardiovascular disease, [and] these conditions could cause the animals to die in transport,” according to the report. Some of NIH’s chimpanzees will not retire to a sanctuary as planned “The NIH’s decision is in the best interest of these elderly and frail animals,” writes Matthew Bailey, president of the Washington, D.C.–based National Association for Biomedical Research, in a statement released today. “The chimpanzees will live out their days in Alamogordo, where … they have forged close bonds with their social groups and their caretakers.”But the Washington, D.C.–based Humane Society of the United States says NIH’s evaluation process was flawed. “The NIH panel didn’t include vets with sanctuary experience, and it just rubber stamped what the labs wanted,” says Kathleen Conlee, the organization’s vice president of animal research issues. She contends that the Alamogordo facility wants to keep the animals because they get NIH funding to care for them. (A spokesperson for the company that manages the facility directed all press queries to NIH.) “We are extremely disappointed that NIH has broken its promise to these chimpanzees,” Conlee says.Ross says NIH shouldn’t just look at the potential drawbacks of moving the animals, but also at the upside. “There are tremendous benefits of getting them in the large, dynamic social groups we have at Chimp Haven,” he says, in which chimps “meet new friends and in most cases keep old friends, too.” He also says many (though not all) of the animals at Chimp Haven are free to climb trees and roam large, open-topped, grassy enclosures—something they can’t do at Alamogordo. “The benefits of sending these animals to a sanctuary far outweigh the risks.”Anderson says NIH’s vets had the best interests of the animals in mind. And he contends that the chimps that will remain at Alamogordo will still live good lives, in their existing social groups and with access to the outdoors (see video above).NIH will next turn its attention to the chimps at the MD Anderson Center. Fifty-nine animals of the animals there have already gone to Chimp Haven this year, Anderson says, but he’s not sure how many of the remaining 63 will make it. “It’s possible some will retire where they are.”*Correction, 25 October, 3:20 p.m.: This story originally misstated the number of chimpanzees owned or supported by the government. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images A chimpanzee munches on a watermelon at Chimp Haven. The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) will not be retiring all of its chimpanzees to a sanctuary, as it originally pledged to do, agency head Francis Collins announced today. Nearly four dozen chimps at a biomedical primate facility in New Mexico will remain there because they are too old and sick to move, he said, although scientific studies of them have ended. Some federally owned or supported chimpanzees at other biomedical primate facilities may also not be retired to sanctuaries.“Some of these animals are quite old and very frail. It was just going to be too unsafe to move all of them,” says NIH Deputy Director James Anderson, whose division oversees the NIH Chimpanzee Management Program. “We’re not going to take the risk.”Chimp Haven in Keithville, Louisiana, the national chimpanzee sanctuary where the animals were supposed to be retired, laments the decision. “We’re disappointed,” says Stephen Ross, the sanctuary’s board chair. “We believe that every chimpanzee should have the opportunity to live out the rest of their life in a sanctuary, and we’re concerned this decision will set a precedent for other chimps still waiting to be retired.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Perisic optimistic over Bayern stay

first_img “I too think that’s possible,” he told the German giants’ official website. “I have a one-year loan contract plus option to purchase. I’m just taking it step by step, from day to day. Let’s see.” “Everything’s positive in Munich so far, both in private and in terms of football. Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/center_img Inter loanee Ivan Perisic says “I too think it’s possible” that Bayern Munich will take up their option to buy him. Perisic fell out of favour at Inter over the summer and subsequently joined Bayern, who can keep him permanently for €25m and whose CEO Karl-Heinz Rummenigge has also hinted at a longer spell for the winger. The Croat spent four years on the blue side of San Siro, arriving from Wolfsburg in the summer of 2015. He made 163 apperances for the Nerazzurri in all competitions, scoring 40 goals and providing 37 assists.last_img read more

It’s less than 100 days to go & city still in disarray

first_imgUsain Bolt may have decided to give the 2010 Commonwealth Games (CWG) a miss. But Delhi will need to draw inspiration from the fastest man on the planet if it wants to be anywhere near the finish line for projects related to the sporting extravaganza.On Friday, the Capital’s race against time entered its last lap as the 100-day countdown to the CWG got off the starting blocks with the Queen’s Baton Relay arriving in India from Pakistan. Even as the Wagah-Attari joint check-post was all decked up for the event, public areas central to hosting the Games lay covered in a haze of dust in Delhi.To be sure, construction work has picked up pace after a sluggish start. Labourers are toiling day and night to get key stadia and roads ready before October, when the CWG kicks off. But the oncoming monsoon – rains are expected in Delhi latest by the first week of July – may put a spanner in the works.Refurbishing Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in south Delhi, where the opening and closing ceremonies are to be held, is turning out to be the biggest challenge for the organisers. The stadium will also host the athletics, lawn bowling and weightlifting events.Initially, it was to be ready by December last year. Six months after the deadline was overshot, nearly 40 per cent of the construction work remains unfinished. This raises doubts about the authorities’ claims that the stadium will be ready by June itself. What’s worse, the delay has pushed up the construction cost to nearly Rs 961 crore, more than double the original estimate of about Rs 455 crore.advertisementCWG venues aren’t the only projects nowhere near completion. At Hotel Ashok, which is being renovated for the Games, almost 80-100 rooms have been sealed as work will not be finished in time. According to officials, the contractor entrusted with the rebuilding job had stopped reporting for work over the past few days. Consequently, the galleries leading to rooms on the fourth and fifth floors had been sealed by the hotel officials.The Chanakyapuri hotel was originally meant to offer over 500 rooms for the Organising Committee of the CWG. The hotel was expected to be ready by the end of 2009. Later, the deadline was extended to May 31, 2010. According to officials, around 182 rooms, guest corridors, a lobby as well as the major public areas were to be rebuilt. Sources said since the contractor could not complete the job by May 31, he failed to turn up thereafter.ITDC sources revealed that renovation work on the seventh floor had been completed and the fifth floor was also nearly ready. But rooms on the fourth floor were still under construction when the contractor left abruptly. On Friday afternoon, when Mail Today visited the hotel premises, the gallery on the fourth floor was found sealed. A hotel employee confirmed that a similar gallery on the fifth floor had also been sealed.An official said the ITDC would float a new tender to resume work and meet the Games deadline. Chief engineer R. M. Kulwani, however, denied that the work had come to a halt.”You have been wrongly informed,” he said. But on being asked why the gallery was sealed, he could not come up with a satisfactory reply.Another case in point is that of MCD projects directly linked to the Games. While the municipal authority started work on the beautification of 23 roads leading to CWG venues a year ago, only half the job has been done to date. And there is an impending speed- breaker in the form of the monsoon.Nearly 35 per cent work remained incomplete on an elevated road between the Commonwealth Games Village in east Delhi and Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium.But Delhi chief secretary Rakesh Mehta exuded optimism.”Work is progressing fine and we hope to complete it by mid- August. Monsoon isn’t really a major threat since it usually rains in short spells in Delhi,” Mehta said.Commenting on a road near Indira Gandhi Stadium that is expected to provide easy access to this venue where cycling, gymnastics and wrestling events will be held, Mehta said it would be ready by next month.Then there is the MCD’s beautification drive. Four roads are to be beautified around Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium. However, work has made only 60 per cent progress. While the deadline for these roads is June 30, it seems another 45 days will be needed for the project to be executed.The estimated cost of these roads is Rs 38.34 crore.The civic body is also revamping guest houses in three zones – Sadar Paharganj, Karol Bagh and the City area – at a cost of Rs 130 crore. Not only are the roads abutting these buildings to be developed, ample parking space is to be provided and streetlights installed. But the work is still in progress. In fact, about 50 per cent of the 57 small lanes are yet to be worked upon by the agency.advertisementClearly, the CWG organisers need to make a marathon effort to pull it off.last_img read more